Pagsanjan

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Pagsanjan
Municipality of Pagsanjan
Downtown area
Downtown area
Official seal of Pagsanjan
Seal
Nickname(s): 
  • Tourist Capital of Laguna
  • Athens of Laguna
  • Home of Our Lady of Guadalupe de Filipinas
Motto(s): 
Mula sa DIYOS, Para sa TAO, Serbisyong TOTOo!
Map of Laguna with Pagsanjan highlighted
Map of Laguna with Pagsanjan highlighted
OpenStreetMap
Pagsanjan is located in Philippines
Pagsanjan
Pagsanjan
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 14°16′N 121°27′E / 14.27°N 121.45°E / 14.27; 121.45Coordinates: 14°16′N 121°27′E / 14.27°N 121.45°E / 14.27; 121.45
Country Philippines
RegionCalabarzon (Region IV-A)
ProvinceLaguna
District4th District
FoundedDecember 12, 1668
Barangays16 (see Barangays)
Government
[1]
 • TypeSangguniang Bayan
 • MayorPeter Casius "Toto" M. Trinidad (PDP–Laban)
 • Vice MayorGirlie "Maita" J. Ejercito
 • CongressmanBenjamin C. Agarao Jr.
 • Sangguniang Bayan
  • Terryl Gamit-Talabong
  • Fred Capistrano
  • Melvin Madriaga
  • Rachelle Abella-Solitario
  • Roderick Nombre
  • Nathanael Bernales II
  • Erlando Subiaga
  • Januario Ferry Garcia
  • Antonio Aquino (ABC)
  • Kathleen Czina Capistrano (SK)
 • Electorate27,328 voters
Area
[2]
 • Total26.36 km2 (10.18 sq mi)
Population
 (2015 census)[3]
 • Total42,164
 • Density1,600/km2 (4,100/sq mi)
 • Households
9,581
Economy
 • Income class3rd municipal income class
 • Poverty incidence4.91% (2015)[4]
 • Revenue₱114,806,855.88 (2016)
Time zoneUTC+8 (PST)
ZIP code
4008
PSGC
IDD:area code+63 (0)49
Climate typetropical monsoon climate
Native languagesTagalog
Websitewww.pagsanjan.gov.ph

Pagsanjan (pronounced Pag-sang-han), officially the Municipality of Pagsanjan (Tagalog: Bayan ng Pagsanjan), is a 3rd class municipality in the province of Laguna, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 42,164 people.[3]

Situated about 92 kilometres (57 mi) southeast of Manila, this town can reach via Manila East Road or Slex. Pagsanjan is the tourist capital of Laguna and is the home of the Bangkero Festival. The bangkeros are tour guides who steer tourists' boats along the river to Pagsanjan Falls (or Magdapio Falls), for which the town is well known but is actually located in the neighboring municipality of Cavinti. The Bangkero Festival is celebrated in the month of March.[5][6]

Pagsanjan was the capital of the province of Laguna for 170 years (1688–1858) during which the town prospered as the commercial, cultural and learning center of the province.[7]

Etymology[edit]

Pagsanjan is located in the riparian delta formed by the confluence of the Balanac and Bumbungan rivers. Originally named Pinagsangahan, meaning "branching" or "juncture", the town was given renamed Pagsanjan by early Spanish colonists because they found it extremely difficult to pronounce its polysyllabic name.

History[edit]

Old Town Gate

Pagsanjan was originally a barrio of Lumban. In 1668, eight Japanese and Chinese traders who were highly impressed by the strategic location of the barrio at the juncture of Balanac and Bumbungan rivers founded the town. They established a trading settlement and engaged in the betelnut industry. In time, the barrio became the flourishing trading center of eastern Laguna and attracted families from the surrounding communities of Cavinti and Pila. On December 12, 1668, the then Governor, General Juan Manuel de la Peña Bonifaz, issued a gubernatorial decree elevating its status from barrio to a town. In 1688, Pagsanjan replaced Bay as the capital of the province. It remained such until 1858, during which it bloomed as the cultural and commercial center of the province.[8]

Geography[edit]

Pagsanjan has a land area of 26.4 square kilometres. It is located about 92 kilometres (57 mi) southeast of Manila. It is bounded on the east by the Balubad Mountain; on the west by the capital town of Santa Cruz; on the north by the San Isidro Hill and Laguna de Bay; on the north-east by the town of Lumban; on the southeast by the towns of Cavinti and Luisiana; on the south by Mount Banahaw; and on the south-west by the town of Magdalena.

Barangays[edit]

Pagsanjan is politically subdivided into 16 barangays.[2]

  • Anibong
  • Biñan
  • Buboy
  • Cabanbanan
  • Calusiche
  • Dingin
  • Lambac
  • Layugan
  • Magdapio
  • Maulawin
  • Pinagsaŋjan
  • Barangay I (Poblacion)
  • Barangay II (Poblacion)
  • Sabang
  • Sampaloc
  • San Isidro

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Pagsanjan, Laguna
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 26
(79)
27
(81)
29
(84)
31
(88)
31
(88)
30
(86)
29
(84)
29
(84)
29
(84)
29
(84)
28
(82)
26
(79)
29
(84)
Average low °C (°F) 22
(72)
22
(72)
22
(72)
23
(73)
24
(75)
25
(77)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
23
(73)
23
(74)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 58
(2.3)
41
(1.6)
32
(1.3)
29
(1.1)
91
(3.6)
143
(5.6)
181
(7.1)
162
(6.4)
172
(6.8)
164
(6.5)
113
(4.4)
121
(4.8)
1,307
(51.5)
Average rainy days 13.4 9.3 9.1 9.8 19.1 22.9 26.6 24.9 25.0 21.4 16.5 16.5 214.5
Source: Meteoblue [9]

Demographics[edit]

Population census of Pagsanjan
YearPop.±% p.a.
1903 6,361—    
1918 7,538+1.14%
1939 8,865+0.78%
1948 9,282+0.51%
1960 10,691+1.18%
1970 14,556+3.13%
1975 16,188+2.15%
1980 19,489+3.78%
1990 25,024+2.53%
1995 28,999+2.80%
2000 32,622+2.56%
2007 35,944+1.35%
2010 39,313+3.31%
2015 42,164+1.34%
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[3][10][11][12]

In the 2015 census, the population of Pagsanjan was 42,164 people,[3] with a density of 1,600 inhabitants per square kilometre or 4,100 inhabitants per square mile.

Notable Pagsanjeños[edit]

Pagsanjan March[edit]

The official song of the Municipality of Pagsanjan and its people is Pagsanjan March. The anthem was composed by Rogel Taiño, a native of Pagsanjan.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Municipality". Quezon City, Philippines: Department of the Interior and Local Government. Retrieved 31 May 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Province: Laguna". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 12 November 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d Census of Population (2015). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. PSA. Retrieved 20 June 2016.
  4. ^ "PSA releases the 2015 Municipal and City Level Poverty Estimates". Quezon City, Philippines. Retrieved 1 January 2020.
  5. ^ "Pagsanjan, Laguna – The Tourist Capital of Laguna". Retrieved 2020-01-17.
  6. ^ "The Philippine Star". The Philippine Star. Retrieved 2020-01-17.
  7. ^ Pagsanjan Official Site Archived 2011-07-27 at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ "Pagsanjan, Laguna – The Tourist Capital of Laguna". Retrieved 2020-01-17.
  9. ^ "Pagsanjan: Average Temperatures and Rainfall". Meteoblue. Retrieved 11 May 2020.
  10. ^ Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. NSO. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  11. ^ Censuses of Population (1903–2007). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Table 1. Population Enumerated in Various Censuses by Province/Highly Urbanized City: 1903 to 2007. NSO.
  12. ^ "Province of Laguna". Municipality Population Data. Local Water Utilities Administration Research Division. Retrieved 17 December 2016.
  13. ^ "Philippine Institute for Development Studies". pids.gov.ph. Retrieved 2020-04-20.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Bay
Capital of Laguna
1688-1858
Succeeded by
Santa Cruz